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LL

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Name

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Structure Class

Ordinary chondrites

Chemical Class

LL6

Country

Year found

2002

Mass

45 kg

[Museum Collection]

(1) 38.8g 

This is 1 of 2919 approved meteorites (plus 2 unapproved names) classified as LL6. Search for this meteorite in the Natural History Museum collection (U.K.): Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 88, MAPS 39, A215-A272 (2004)

Bensour

Name

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Structure Class

Ordinary chondrites

Chemical Class

LL6

Country

Year found

2023

Mass

33.5 kg

[Museum Collection]

(1) 72g 

History: On the night of 8 July 2023, a meteorite shower occurred on flat, cultivated land, in fields and among small settlements north of the town of Boutel Fil. Three sonic booms were heard. People found black stones on the ground the following morning and started to collect them. The event triggered media coverage in Chad, leading to private initiatives to recover stones from the villagers. Marcin Cimala (Poland) sent a 33 g sample to Ansgar Greshake (MNB) for classification. Jean-Claude Doumnang, professor of Geology at the University of N’Djamena and responsible for the declaration of the previous fall from Chad, Andila (2014), heard about the event while in France working with P. Rochette (CEREGE). Upon return to N’Djamena in early August he visited the Ministry of Mines, which had sent geologists to inquire about the event on July 23. They were shown the site where a large stone had excavated a shallow cavity in soil about 0.5 m in diameter. This site is the one for which coordinates are reported. They were able to observe 6 fully crusted fresh stones from 44 to 316 g. They also made pXRF analysis of one stone, confirming the chondritic composition (abundance of Mg and Fe, presence of Ni). In N’Djamena Jean-Claude Doumnang and his contacts met a number of people who own pieces of the meteorite, and secured two samples, for N’djamena University and for CEREGE. Physical characteristics: Many individual rocks, most of which are partly to completely covered with pale black fusion crust. Broken surfaces display a fresh light-grayish interior. Petrography: (A. Greshake, MNB) The meteorite is an ordinary chondrite showing a thoroughly recrystallized texture with few poorly delineated relict chondrules. Main minerals are olivine, low-Ca pyroxene, and sodic plagioclase (grain size about 70 µm). More minor phases include Ca-pyroxene, Cl-apatite, troilite, and rare FeNi metal. Few black melt clasts are present. Geochemistry: olivine: Fa27.9±0.2 (Fa27.6-28.3, FeO/MnO=54±2, n=7); low-Ca pyroxene: Fs22.0±0.3Wo1.7±0.2 (Fs21.7-22.5Wo0.9-1.0, FeO/MnO=31±2, n=7); Ca-pyroxene: Fs8.8±0.4Wo43.0±2.3 (Fs8.6-9.7Wo37.3-44.1, FeO/MnO=22±2, n=7); feldspar: An10.2-10.7Ab83.4-85.2Or4.3-6.0, n=7. Magnetic susceptibility, measured with SM30 instrument is log χ (× 10-9 m3/kg)=3.99. Specimens: 33.5 g including one polished thin section are at MNB. 20.5 g including one polished thin section are at UWB under work name WZY-183. About 80 g are at CEREGE and about 30 g at the University of N’Djamena. Polandmet - Marcin Cimala holds 16 kg, WangZ purchased a total of 9.5 kg including one large 3.5 kg stone, Miguel Angel Contreras Gomez holds 7 kg, and Viktor Ivanov holds 670 g. Remainder held by anonymous finders.

Boutel Fil
Chelyabinsk

Name

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Structure Class

Ordinary chondrites

Chemical Class

LL5

Country

Year found

2013

Mass

1 t

[Museum Collection]

(1) 112.9g   (2) 52.9g   (3) 31.7g   (4) 31.5g

(5) 26.7g   (6) 26.5g   (7) 23.6g   (8) 4.8g

(9) 4.1g   (10) 4.1g   (11) 3.9g   (12) 3.3g

(13) 3.1g   (14) 3.0g   (15) 2.9g   (16) 2.5g

(17) 1.8g   (18) 1.7g   (19) 1.5g

History: At 9:22 a.m. (local time) on February 15, 2013, a bright fireball was seen by numerous residents in parts of the Kurgan, Tyumen, Ekaterinburg and Chelyabinsk districts. Images of the fireball were captured by many video cameras, especially in Chelyabinsk. Residents of the Chelyabinsk district heard the sound of a large explosion. The impact wave destroyed many windows in Chelyabinsk and surrounding cities. Many people were wounded by glass fragments. A part of the roof and a wall of a zinc plant and a stadium in Chelyabinsk were also damaged. Numerous (thousands) stones fell as a shower around Pervomaiskoe, Deputatsky and Yemanzhelinka villages ~40 km S of Chelyabinsk. The meteorite pieces were recovered and collected out of snow by local people immediately after the explosion. The snow cover was about 0.7 m deep. The falling stones formed holes surrounded by firm snow. Largest stones reached the frozen soil. A stone may have broken the ice of Chebarkul Lake, located 70 km W of Chelyabinsk. Small meteorite fragments were found around the 8 m hole in the ice but divers did not find any stones on the lake bottom. Physical characteristics: The meteorite stones and fragments are from 100 kg and perhaps > 500 kg. Fusion crusted stones are common. The fusion crust is black or brown and fresh. Broken fragments are rare. The interior of the stones is fresh but in some pieces there is evidence for weak oxidation of metal grains. Petrography: (D.D. Badyukov and M.A. Nazarov, Vernad). The majority (2/3) of the stones are composed of a light-colored lithology with a typical chondritic texture. Chondrules (~63%) are readily delineated and set within a fragmental matrix. The mean chondrule diameter is 0.93 mm. The chondrule glass is devitrified. The main phases are olivine and orthopyroxene. Olivine shows mosaicism and planar fractures. Rare grains of augite and clinobronzite are present. Small and rare feldspar grains show undulatory extinction, planar deformation features, and are partly isotropic. Troilite (4 vol.%) and FeNi metal (1.3 vol.%) occur as irregularly shaped grains. Accessory minerals are chromite, ilmenite, and Cl-apatite. A significant portion (1/3) of the stones consist of a dark, fine-grained impact melt containing mineral and chondrule fragments. Feldspar is well developed and practically isotropic. No high-pressure phases were found in the impact melt. There are black-colored thin shock veins in both light and dark lithologies. Geochemistry: (M.A. Nazarov, N.N. Kononkova, and I.V. Kubrakova, Vernad). Mineral chemistry: Olivine Fa 27.9±0.35, N=22; orthopyroxene Fs22.8±0.8Wo1.30±0.26, N=17; feldspar Ab86; chromite Fe/Fe+Mg=0.90, Cr/Cr+Al=0.85 (at.%). Major element composition of the light lithology (XRF, ICP-AS, wt%): Si=18.3, Ti=0.053, Al=1.12, Cr=0.40, Fe=19.8, Mn=0.26, Ca=1.43, Na=0.74, K=0.11, P=0.10, Ni=1.06, Co=0.046, S=1.7. Atomic ratios of Zn/Mn × 100=1.3, Al/Mn=8.8. The impact melt lithology has almost the same composition but it is distinctly higher in Ni, Zn, Cu, Mo, Cd, W, Re, Pb, Bi (ICP-MS). Classification: Ordinary chondrite (LL5), shock stage S4, weathering W0. Specimens: About 400 stones weighing 3.5 kg in total and a few thin sections are in Vernad.

Karatu

Name

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Structure Class

Ordinary chondrites

Chemical Class

LL6

Country

Year found

1963

Mass

2.22 kg

[Museum Collection]

(1) 2.02g

This is 1 of 2888 approved meteorites (plus 2 unapproved names) classified as LL6. Search for specimens in the Smithsonian Institution collection (U.S.): Search for this meteorite in the Natural History Museum collection (U.K.): Never published in the Meteoritical Bulletin

Parnallee

Name

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Structure Class

Ordinary chondrites

Chemical Class

LL3.6

Country

Year found

1857

Mass

77.6 kg

[Museum Collection]

(1) 7.9g  (2) 3.13g

This is 1 of 21 approved meteorites classified as LL3.6. Search for specimens in the Smithsonian Institution collection (U.S.): Search for this meteorite in the Natural History Museum collection (U.K.): Never published in the Meteoritical Bulletin

Soko-Banja

Name

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Structure Class

Ordinary chondrites

Chemical Class

LL4

Country

Year found

1877

Mass

80 kg

[Museum Collection]

(1) 0.31g

This is 1 of 389 approved meteorites classified as LL4. Search for specimens in the Smithsonian Institution collection (U.S.): Search for this meteorite in the Natural History Museum collection (U.K.): Search for this meteorite in the Museo Nazionale dell'Antartide database (Siena, Italy): Never published in the Meteoritical Bulletin

NWA5205

Name

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Structure Class

Ordinary chondrites

Chemical Class

LL3.2

Country

Year found

2006

Mass

4 kg

[Museum Collection]

(1) 5.40g   (2) 33.10g   (3) 11.96g   (4) 3.39g

This is 1 of 21 approved meteorites classified as LL3.2. Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 97, MAPS 45, 449-493 (2010)

NWA5206

Name

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Structure Class

Ordinary chondrites

Chemical Class

LL3.05

Country

Year found

2007

Mass

128 g

[Museum Collection]

(1) 14.55g

This is 1 of 5 approved meteorites classified as LL3.05. Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 97, MAPS 45, 449-493 (2010)

Name

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Structure Class

Ordinary chondrites

Chemical Class

LL3

Country

Year found

2012

Mass

1050 g

[Museum Collection]

(1) 7.0g

History: Purchased by E. Twelker in February 2012 from a Moroccan dealer at the Tucson Gem and Mineral Show. Petrography: (A. Irving and S. Kuehner, UWS) Relatively fresh specimen composed of closely packed, well-formed chondrules (0.3-2.7 mm, mean 1.8 mm in diameter) with a relatively low content of metal (some fresh and some partially altered). Olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, sodic plagioclase, chromite, altered kamacite and troilite. Geochemistry: Olivine (Fa0.2-89.6; Cr2O3 in ferroan olivine 0.02-0.11 wt.%, mean 0.05 wt.%, s.d. 0.03 wt.%, N = 9), orthopyroxene (Fs2.4-22.1Wo0.3-0.9, N = 3), clinopyroxene (Fs3.9-8.9Wo40.7-45.2). Classification: Ordinary chondrite (LL3). Specimens: A total of 30.8 g of material and one polished thin section are on deposit at UWB. Twelker holds the main mass.

NWA7676
NWA8324

Name

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Structure Class

Ordinary chondrites

Chemical Class

LL6

Country

Year found

2013

Mass

1100 g

[Museum Collection]

(1) 27.15g   (2) 19.52g

This is 1 of 2888 approved meteorites (plus 2 unapproved names) classified as LL6. Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 103, MAPS 52, 1014, May 2017

NWA8655

Name

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Structure Class

Ordinary chondrites

Chemical Class

LL5-melt breccia

Country

Year found

2014

Mass

6.44 kg

[Museum Collection]

(1) 22.1g

History: Purchased by Jason Phillips in Octber 2014 from a Moroccan dealer. Petrography: (A. Irving and S. Kuehner, UWS) Composed of recrystallized clasts containing sparse, relatively large (up to 2.8 mm) remnant chondrules within a dark, very fine-grained matrix. The very fine-grained matrix is black (almost opaque in thin section) and contains shred-like grains of metal and rounded troilite blebs (both indicative of melting). Shock stages were S2 for clasts, and S6 for matrix. Geochemistry: Olivine (Fa26.8-27.1, N = 3), orthopyroxene (Fs21.7-22.0Wo1.4-1.3, N = 3), clinopyroxene (Fs7.3-7.7Wo45.9-46.0). Analyses were done for both clasts and matrix. Classification: Ordinary chondrite (LL5 melt breccia). Specimens: 38 g including one polished thin section at UWB; main mass with J. Phillips.

NWA8757

Name

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Structure Class

Ordinary chondrites

Chemical Class

LL6

Country

Year found

2014

Mass

710 g

[Museum Collection]

(1) 21.79g   (2) 19.69g

This is 1 of 2888 approved meteorites (plus 2 unapproved names) classified as LL6. Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 104, MAPS 52, 2284, Octover 2017

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